credit


Audrey Horne by Episode | Pilot [Northwest Passage]

...a delicate, Botticelli-like beauty, with a halo of wavy black hair   and dark, haunted eyes...

An ongoing project for my boo Savvy



peremadeleine:

books I love {in no particular order}
⇝ Girl’s Guide to Witchcraft by Mindy Klasky

"First, I take it you’re a familiar."
"And I take it you’re a witch."
"No, I’m a librarian."
"Who just happens to work spells. No need to play coy with me, girlfriend."



Libba Bray.



christinedaae asked: the mountains or the sea



notgoodnotnicejustright:

don’t try to make phoebe into a hardass

don’t try to make cosette into a hardass

don’t try to make every feminine and sensitive female character into a “badass”. you can be both, but there’s nothing wrong with phoebe d’ysquith and cosette the way they are.

#there’s more to strength than just being hard



Why do I even read Goodreads reviews?

Read More



books I love {in no particular order}
⇝ Girl’s Guide to Witchcraft by Mindy Klasky

"First, I take it you’re a familiar."
"And I take it you’re a witch."
"No, I’m a librarian."
"Who just happens to work spells. No need to play coy with me, girlfriend."



the pope was in my dream last night

he gave me this big bear hug and we talked forever and it was really great

but i woke up sad because I’ll probably never get to hug the pope



Hey, friends; this review of Blood Sisters (on Amazon) was written by someone much more well-versed in Wars of the Roses scholarship than I, and some of you might find it interesting/valuable—probably moreso than mine! The reviewer does share some of my gripes (and confirms some of them that I may not have voiced—namely, Gristwood’s easy acceptance of the H7/EoY love story).

My only minor complaint is that the reviewer calls Alison Weir a historian (I, snob that I am, respectfully disagree), but that’s neither here nor there.



❝ There is yet another possibility, however: that when Elizabeth Woodville herself left sanctuary in 1484, possibly sometime after her daughters, she had reason to know that Richard was not guilty of her sons’ deaths.

…It has been suggested that either or both of the “Princes” left the Tower alive and that when Elizabeth Woodville emerged from sanctuary, it was because she had been promised her sons, or at least the younger of them, would be quietly allowed to join her. The elder boy [Edward V] has been said to have been ill in the summer of 1483, and it is possible he had died from natural causes. (It is worth noing that none of the latr pretenders to Henry VII’s throne…claimed to be the elder prince, suggesting he, unlike his brother, was known by then to be dead.) … But any such theory, of course, still leaves the boys’ true fate a mystery.

The real mystery about the Princes in the Tower, ultimately, concerns the behavior of the women in the case. That the Princes’ mother and sisters might have, within months of the boys’ deaths, made friends with their murderer [Richard] has been put down to fear, in a brutal age, and to pragmatism, in a harsh one. But one wonders if human nature has really changed that much. Of course, it can be assumed that if Richard gave assurances of his innocence, the women were eager to be convinced; they had, after all, few other options than compliance. But if Elizabeth Woodville believed her boys were not murdered—or not murdered by Richard—it would explain everything even more simply. ❞
—— Sarah Gristwood, Blood Sisters: The Women Behind the Wars of the Roses